Free Download: Ciara – Overdose (Tuff Turf Remix)

Tuff Turf latest offering is a Deep, Housey remix of Ciara latest hit “Overdose”. The Tuff Turf duo consists of two veteran San Diego Club DJs. Angle & Este. Each has firmly established themselves in the San Diego nightlife scene.

Mostly playing open format gigs , the duo decided to get back to some of their “Djing Roots” and open opportunities to play some of their favorite styles of music. Their remixes and originals all have a similar sound and vibe. A Deep, Vocally, Nu-Disco, House feel. This “hybrid” has quickly gained support from artists such as Cajoline, Le Youth, & Steed Lord just to name a few.

Posted by Freddy Gonzalez

Miami’s DJ Obscene on Club Killers Radio

Just in time for Ultra & Winter Music Conference we have the return of one of the USA’s most listened to DJs, Miami’s DJ Obscene! Next time you’re Miami make sure you tune & listen to Obscene on Y100 Miami & Evolution 93.5.

Stay connected with him via his website ObsceneSounds.com Any DJs looking for full track list click continue reading.

TRACKLIST:
Chardy, Stevie Mink- Yoo
TV Noise- Yamidoo
Cosmic Gate- So Get Up (Pelari Remix)
Diplo & GTA- Boy Oh Boy (DJ Obscene & Julian B. Remix)
Deniz Koyu- Ruby
Empire Of The Sun- Celebrate (Steve Aoki Remix)
R3hab- Samurai (Go Hard)
Wayne & Woods- Favela
Tujamo- Hey Mister – Obscene Edit
DVBBS & Vinai- Raveology
Alvaro & Laidback Luke- Break The House Down (Tribute Remix)
Cash Cash & Adrian Lux- Bullet
Deorro- Unspoiled Perfection
Tonite Only Feat. Yeah Boy- Touch
MOTi- Don’t Go Lose It
Disclosure- Latch (Cold Blank Remix)
Awolnation- Sail (Joe Maz Remix)
Hardwell Feat. Matthew Koma- Dare You (Cash Cash Remix)
Clean Bandit- Rather Be (DJ Obscene Remix)

Posted by David Miller


Free Download: Ciara – Overdose (Tuff Turf Remix)

Tuff Turf latest offering is a Deep, Housey remix of Ciara latest hit “Overdose”. The Tuff Turf duo consists of two veteran San Diego Club DJs. Angle & Este. Each has firmly established themselves in the San Diego nightlife scene.

Mostly playing open format gigs , the duo decided to get back to some of their “Djing Roots” and open opportunities to play some of their favorite styles of music. Their remixes and originals all have a similar sound and vibe. A Deep, Vocally, Nu-Disco, House feel. This “hybrid” has quickly gained support from artists such as Cajoline, Le Youth, & Steed Lord just to name a few.

Posted by Freddy Gonzalez


Eminem’s Spike Lee-Directed ‘Headlights’ Video Is The Perfect Mother’s Day Tribute

It’s only fitting that Eminem decided to release the video for his song “Headlights” on Mother’s Day. The track, which features Nate Ruess and appears on Eminem’s most recent album “Marshall Mathers LP 2,” is basically an open letter to his mother, Debbie Mathers, apologizing for the hatred-filled lyrics he has directed at her since his career took off in the late 1990s. Despite all that, Eminem makes clear in the song, he still loves her. Sample lyric: “Did I take it too far?/ ‘Cleaning Out My Closet’/and all them other songs/But regardless I don’t hate you ’cause/Ma, you’re still beautiful to me/’cause you’re my mom.”

Directed by Spike Lee, who hasn’t shot a music video since Michael Jackson’s “This Is It” in 2009, the majority of the clip is shot from the first-person perspective of Eminem’s mother, interspersed with video clips and photo album pictures from Eminem’s youth. The video climaxes with the rapper and his mother meeting on his driveway for a heartwarming embrace.

Posted by Ryan Kristobak (Via Huffington Post)


Afrojack, Calvin Harris & Pasquale Rotella’s “headliners” rock Electric Daisy Carnival New York.

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The most influential DJ at this weekend’s Electric Daisy Carnival in New York opened the festival’s mainstage early on the first day: It was the French producer Cedric Gervais, whose 2012 hit “Molly” has inspired a catch phrase emblazoned on thousands of t-shirts across the parking lot of Citi Field, the home stadium for the Mets. “Have you seen Molly?” the song goes. “She makes me want to dance.” Much more than a cheeky request for MDMA via a garment purchasable from the Shore Store, it embodied the zeitgeist – not just that of the largest electronic dance music festival in America, but of the party generation. Rave culture has taken over this generation full bore, and the kids are so invested that thousands of young women hot-glued their bras with rhinestones, glowsticks and silk daisies, clearly prepping for this experience for weeks. Rare was the beefed-up bro not emblazoned in some kind of neon, making eyes at said bras while working on their Melbourne shuffle. This was Spring Breakers, Queens edition.

It goes without saying that dance music festivals Stateside are finally catching up to their European counterparts – this year, each leg of the two-day Electric Daisy Carnival New York attracted 50,000 people, paltry compared to the sold-out 325,000 who will descend on Vegas when the main festival hits in late June. Even so, the vastness of the experience was impressive and, at times, overwhelming, blanketed across four stages, a clutch of carnival rides, dazzling fireworks displays, and technicolor light installations, including the fest’s signature LED daisy the size of a tract house. (The Citi Field parking lot is huge!)

The two massive main stages were situated adjacent to each other with a ferris wheel and a Zipper ride wedged between. The first night, anyone (everyone) attempting to see simultaneous sets by house heavyweight Eric Prydz versus Swedish House Mafia mastermind Steve Angello got smooshed into a giant, disorienting rave pit. If any of those t-shirt kids ever found Molly, they surely lost the rest of their friends in the crush. But if they stood at the right spot at the bow of the ferris wheel, they could hear both stages at the same time, the speakers sending .wavs across the asphalt (which is, apparently, a great sound conductor). It was a perfect confluence of thump, where it almost didn’t matter if their sets were indistinguishable – most were lost in the ecstasy of the moment.

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Still, several of the main-draw headliners proved their mettle. British producer Calvin Harris showed why he is such a force in the pop world, blending a crowd-pleasing set that included Basement Jaxx’s “Where’s Your Head At,” Justice’s “We Are Your Friends,” and his own “Flashback” – three songs released in the 2000s, practically relics at this point, yet the young-20-something-skewing crowd sang along gamely. (He didn’t make anyone wait for the megahit he made for Rihanna, “We Found Love,” dropping it about a quarter-way through to a stadium’s worth of squeals.) Harris’ harder counterpart in the pop world, ubiquitous Dutch producer Afrojack, crescendoed-and-dropped his crowd to submission before toning it down to a little piano set. “This is the best fucking EDM scene on the whole fucking planet!” he effused, keys twinkling. At a farther-flung stage beneath a tent, the British house icon Carl Cox played an understated set with a deft hand, hewing to gradual vibe creation rather than the power of the drop – music for dancers with attention spans.

But it took performers on the smaller stages to show how diverse America’s new ravers are, while making a good argument against using the term “EDM” – electronic dance music – as a corporate catch-all. Los Angeles dubstep god 12th Planet made a case for “trap rave” as a vessel to get dance kids to listen to rap music, blending hits like Ace Hood’s “Bugatti” into tasteful dubstep bass and post-Lex Luger triple-time beats. Seth Troxler, the Michigan-born house DJ, played a sophisticated set of minimal techno with a serious mid-range groove, while the DC duo Nadastrom blended their signature moombahton set with nods to dembow and even bhangra, up to and including a tweaky bass version of Elvis Crespo’s “Suavemente.” And when DJ Fresh played dead prez’s “Hip-Hop” over a corpo techno track, was it a referendum? Nope, it was just a segue into a trap song, exemplifying the jumble of music that occurs at Electric Daisy Carnival. His set, especially, was all over the map, but he tied it together at the end with a surprise guest – rapper Dominique Young Unique, performing a live version of their track “Earthquake.”

Several performers weren’t DJs at all, but bands, and had to use their creativity to fit in at a festival where rock music is an anomaly. Australian duo Empire of the Sun channeled Bowie with gold sequins and glowing neon guitars, while Italian producer Bloody Beatroots blurred the lines between rave and metal, in the tradition of Atari Teenage Riot and, well, Skrillex before him. The birdlike young British singer La Roux, wearing a white trenchcoat and looking like she was born to play Tilda Swinton in a Funny or Die skit, surprisingly opened with her two biggest hits to date – “Into the Kill” and “Fascination” – before debuting three songs from her forthcoming album. “Kiss and Not Tell” was a pared-down, simple synth track with a big pop hook, while “Sexytheque” had a touch of ’80s-influenced new wave.

Raves and dance music have to battle bad reps as drug havens now as they did in the 1990s, and “Where’s Molly?” merchandise isn’t helping. But lest this weekend’s EDC seem like one orgiastic cuddle puddle, consider this: Smack in the middle of 12th Planet’s set, the New York sun gleaming on all the neon, a young man not older than 19, eating a strawberry fruit popsicle and wearing a t-shirt bearing the logo, “MUSIC makes me high.” The kid, grinning, screams, “I can’t believe this is happening right now!” The party culture may define the zeitgeist, but it’s always the music that matters most.

Posted by Julianne Escobedo Sheperd (via Rolling Stone)


Five First Impressions of New Drais Nightclub

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1. That “wow factor”: Nightlife owner/operator Victor Drai claims he always gives clubbers at least one reason to drop their jaws upon entering his clubs, and on this writer’s visit, chins were slamming the floor at the top of the Drai’s Nightclub stairs. The only downside of that moment—that first sight of a new all-stops-pulled dance space, surrounded by LED screens and trumped only by the view of the exotic Beach Club (and Las Vegas Strip) dead ahead—was wondering if the rest of the night could match it.

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2. That party: Our fears were quickly allayed. Maybe it was just the casualness of a Friday night in Las Vegas, but on May 23, Drai’s only felt crammed toward the front of the dancefloor, where revelers prepared for headliner Eric Prydz. Drai had hoped for less DJ worship at his Cromwell topper, and by and large, there were more clubbers than concert-gazers, but for some, old habits seem to die hard. Luckily, the dancefloor was large enough to accommodate the rest of us who enjoy actual dancing, and dance we did to one of the best Prdyz sets we’ve heard in awhile. Also adding to the comfort level: wide walkways for shuffling patrons and an open pool area for some thump reprieve.

3. That outdoor oasis: And speaking of: Drai’s Beach Club is arguably more gorgeous than the 11th floor view its marketing touts. Not even the occasional sprinkle could drive attendees from socializing poolside or taking in the adjacent Strip or even sitting a spell if they happened to catch some open cushion. Its red/white/gold color scheme gave the space its class, while the towering palms dotting the pool perimeter lent it a bit of paradise.

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4. That nu-school disco ball: If all eyes weren’t on the DJ booth—where dancers also slinked and shimmied in front of and aside the man dispensing the beats—that’s because the star of the show may have been the steel, illuminated polyhedron levitating above the dancefloor. It looked like a cross between the Death Star and Caesars’ old Omnimax Theatre, and while it didn’t immerse the room in spinning lights—other mechanisms provided different room-chasing effects—it mesmerized nonetheless. It’s probably dominating your Instagram feed right now, as it should be.

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5. That bass: A horizontal speaker stack graced the rear of that aforementioned dancefloor, and it discernibly jumbled the organs of anyone dancing within 10 feet of it (or sitting atop it). It was pretty potent during Prdyz’s straight-ahead progressive house set, so imagine what brain-rattling reverberation a trap-friendly DJ set could cause. That might be reason enough to endure one.

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Posted by Mike Prevatt (Via LV Weekly
Photos by Drais Nightclub


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